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From the Vault By Alexandra Kroeger, Assistant Curator  Although it looks similar to the typical Mennonite Kroeger clock, it was not made by the Kroeger family. This clock, still bearing its original makers mark, was made by Kornelius Hildebrand in 1856. According to a piece of paper that used to be attached to the back of the clock, it was repainted twice - in 1912 and 1968 - before being repaired and restored by Arthur Kroeger in 2002.  It probably came into the family after the marriage…

From the Vault By Alexandra Kroeger, Assistant Curator Although it looks similar to the typical Mennonite Kroeger clock, it was not made by the Kroeger family. This clock, still bearing its original makers mark, was made by Kornelius Hildebrand in 1856. According to a piece of paper that used to be attached to the back of the clock, it was repainted twice - in 1912 and 1968 - before being repaired and restored by Arthur Kroeger in 2002. It probably came into the family after the marriage…

This clock, one of only four known surviving Lepp clocks, was made in 1843 by Peter Lepp in the Chortitza Colony, Russia (now Ukraine). Peter Lepp trained Gerhard Hamm as a clockmaker, who in turn trained Kornelius Hildebrand. The Mandtler family of the Molotschna Colony were also clockmakers.  1843 Lepp Clock hung for a photo shoot.

This clock, one of only four known surviving Lepp clocks, was made in 1843 by Peter Lepp in the Chortitza Colony, Russia (now Ukraine). Peter Lepp trained Gerhard Hamm as a clockmaker, who in turn trained Kornelius Hildebrand. The Mandtler family of the Molotschna Colony were also clockmakers. 1843 Lepp Clock hung for a photo shoot.