Przemysław Herman

Przemysław Herman

Przemysław Herman
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PHANTOM CORSAIR, 1938 // Vintage & Classic Car Design This design is just perfect to make the first flying, levitating or  amphibious car, flawless ....  its so perfect it makes the wheel technology feel outdated !

PHANTOM CORSAIR, 1938 // Vintage & Classic Car Design This design is just perfect to make the first flying, levitating or amphibious car, flawless . its so perfect it makes the wheel technology feel outdated !

1957 Netik. Built in Czechoslovakia.The front of the car was quite wide; the rear more narrow. The vehicle (and its colours) was simply ugly. It was a five-seater with 3 persons in the front - driver in the middle - and two behind. It had rear wheel steering, and a 619cc single cylinder engine top speed 75 mph.

1957 Netik, built in Czechoslovakia.The car's front was quite wide, the rear more narrow. It was a five-seater with 3 persons in the front—driver in the middle—and two behind. It had rear wheel steering, and a single cylinder engine top speed 75 mph.

Drive Movie Bus from Crow’s Nest (Modern Mechanix, 1935). UNIQUE in design is the multiple-wheeler shown below, which was designed for a film now being made at the Paramount studios. The 36-passenger vehicle is operated by a driver who sits in a glass-enclosed crow’s nest jutting out from the 15-foot roof. The road liner has an oddly-shaped tail fin which extends high over the rear observation platform. The bus has four rear wheels and a circular vent in front in order to cool the radiator."

1935 Traveling band bus from movie "Stolen Harmony", show custom concept car prototype streamlined aerodynamic retro futuristic cool deco sleek RV camper camping glamping motorhome

WWW.PACKAIR.COM  Plymouth XNR concept car (1960), named after Chrysler design chief Virgil Exner. A striking asymmetric design streamlined the hood air scoop to instrument housing, driver's headrest and rear fin. The grille frame doubled as a front bumper. The 'X-motif' rear bumper was a visual reminder of the car's name. Built in 1959 by Ghia, it was powered by a 170 slant-six engine prepared to NASCAR specs, which on Chrysler's testing track, had a top speed of 150 mph

COM Plymouth XNR concept car named after Chrysler design chief Virgil Exner. A striking asymmetric design streamlined the hood air scoop to instrument housing, driver's headrest a (New Top Design)