two ceramic teapots are sitting next to each other on a gray background and one has a bird painted on it
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Artists, Ceramics

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A large Kokuto scalloping sculpture on three adjoined pedestal feet by Yamaguchi Mio titled Taiji no Yume (Fetal Dream)dating from late 2023. Here the young artist has ventured into black clay, eschewing altogether glaze of any kind. What you have is simply the direct, dark clay and the earthen texture, with no frills or decoration. It is 40 x 43 x 60 cm (16 x 17 x 24 inches) and is in excellent condition, directly from the artist. It comes with a signed wooden placard. Due to size and weight this will require special shipping consideration. Yamaguchi Mio was born in Aichi prefecture in 1992, and graduated advanced studies at the Aichi University of Education in 2017. While still at university, her works were selected for show at the JoryuTogei Ten Female Ceramic Artist Association Exhibition (2014). In 2016 she was awarded at the 3rd Kogei in Kanazawa Competition, Grand Prize at the Ceramic Art in the Present Tense Exhibition at the Hagi Uragami Museum as well received the governors prize at the 5oth Female Ceramic Artist Association Exhibition. In 2017 she was selected for the 11th International Ceramics Competition in Mino. She took a job as a teacher, but could not fight the need to create, so enrolled in the Tajimi City Ceramics research facility, graduating in2020. Her work is currently on view in the Chicago Institute of Arts, and was featured on the cover of the catalog for that exhibition, Radical Clay. According to Mio: I feel that my fascination towards the natural world’s use of repetition, in bee hives and on the surface of corals, appears in my work as I consume and absorb the world around me. I like to believe that these works are natural forms made by my own hands. When I mold clay, I have a sensation that my body and consciousness blends and binds with the material and the natural world. The process of building upon each coil and applying each fold one by one with my hands is a form of meditation. Through this repetitive process I want to be able to convey my thoughts at the time in the texture, such as my struggle of swaying between the desires to live freely and falling under the pressure from societal expectations. It calms me down to observe the fingerprints left in the surface and see the traces of my existence in the clay. These works are products of what I have absorbed around me.