Łódź

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Winter in Źródliska Park. Łódź, Poland.

Winter in Źródliska Park. Łódź, Poland.

The world's largest pre-funeral building. Jewish Cemetery in Łódź, Poland

The world's largest pre-funeral building. Jewish Cemetery in Łódź, Poland

Otrhodox church, Łódź, Poland.

Otrhodox church, Łódź, Poland.

jewish cementery - the world's largest pre-funeral building

jewish cementery - the world's largest pre-funeral building

Sukkah

Sukkah

Jewish cemetery

Jewish cemetery

Spring in Żródliska Square.

Spring in Żródliska Square.

Park Źródliska.

Park Źródliska.

Synagogue

Synagogue


Więcej pomysłów
The Chesed Shel Emet, the ultimate act of love + kindness, is shown to the…

The Chesed Shel Emet, the ultimate act of love + kindness, is shown to the…

Natural Green Casket   $589 - This is pretty much all I want.  Hoping my family sees it the way I do when the time comes.

Natural Green Casket $589 - This is pretty much all I want. Hoping my family sees it the way I do when the time comes.

This is a Yahrzeit Memorial Candle. A Yahrzeit (Yiddish for "a year's time") is the anniversary of the death of a loved one. Every year it is Jewish custom (minhag) to light a special candle that burns for 24 hours, called a Yahrzeit candle. The candle is lit on the Yahrzeit date of that person's death, as well as on certain holidays and during the initial mourning period immediately following a death.

This is a Yahrzeit Memorial Candle. A Yahrzeit (Yiddish for "a year's time") is the anniversary of the death of a loved one. Every year it is Jewish custom (minhag) to light a special candle that burns for 24 hours, called a Yahrzeit candle. The candle is lit on the Yahrzeit date of that person's death, as well as on certain holidays and during the initial mourning period immediately following a death.

Jewish Burial Practices

February 6, 2004 ~ Jewish Burial Practices

Jewish Burial Practices

A Plain Pine Box: A Return to Simple Jewish Funerals and Eternal Traditions

A Plain Pine Box: A Return to Simple Jewish Funerals and Eternal Traditions

The Jewish Way in Death and Mourning  I believe I read this one in college for one of my classes....

The Jewish Way in Death and Mourning I believe I read this one in college for one of my classes....

A view of the Jewish cemetery on the Mount of Olives, overlooking the Old City of Jerusalem. Many Jews in Israel and beyond wish to be buried in this burial ground as it overlooks the Valley of Jehoshaphat where scriptures say the Last Judgement will take place. The valley itself is the dip between the cemetery and the city walls.

A view of the Jewish cemetery on the Mount of Olives, overlooking the Old City of Jerusalem. Many Jews in Israel and beyond wish to be buried in this burial ground as it overlooks the Valley of Jehoshaphat where scriptures say the Last Judgement will take place. The valley itself is the dip between the cemetery and the city walls.

Memories of Warsaw, A Jewish Funeral in Warsaw ~ Israel Bernbaum (Warsaw Poland, 1921 - 1993) His paintings had been in his heart for a long time. Bernbaum notes that although he survived, he considers self one of the six million Jews that the Nazis killed. He has a compulsion, as he calls it, to tell the story of those who were killed in the death camps.

Memories of Warsaw, A Jewish Funeral in Warsaw ~ Israel Bernbaum (Warsaw Poland, 1921 - 1993) His paintings had been in his heart for a long time. Bernbaum notes that although he survived, he considers self one of the six million Jews that the Nazis killed. He has a compulsion, as he calls it, to tell the story of those who were killed in the death camps.

Worms, Germany - The oldest Jewish cemetery in Europe, the Heiliger Sand Cemetery was used for burial for more than 900 years. The earliest tombstone dates back to 1076 AD, the last burial was in 1940.  Unlike people from other religions, Jews do not typically place flowers at gravesites. Instead, they often place stones on the grave or tombstone.

Worms, Germany - The oldest Jewish cemetery in Europe, the Heiliger Sand Cemetery was used for burial for more than 900 years. The earliest tombstone dates back to 1076 AD, the last burial was in 1940. Unlike people from other religions, Jews do not typically place flowers at gravesites. Instead, they often place stones on the grave or tombstone.

This rope handled pine casket is from Connecticut Casket Company. It is certified for Orthodox Jewish burials by a Rabbi and is also Green Certified.

This rope handled pine casket is from Connecticut Casket Company. It is certified for Orthodox Jewish burials by a Rabbi and is also Green Certified.

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