Paweł Poloczek

Paweł Poloczek

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Paweł Poloczek
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This medieval oak chest might be described as an ‘armourer’s chest’, as it was made to store a suit of plate armour – probably parade amour. It dates to the mid fifteenth century, and measures 77 1/2″ long x 31 1/4″ high x 19 1/2″ deep. The interior (with divider to accommodate a helm) features …

This medieval oak chest might be described as an ‘armourer’s chest’, as it was made to store a suit of plate armour – probably parade amour. It dates to the mid fifteenth century, and measures 77 1/2″ long x 31 1/4″ high x 19 1/2″ deep. The interior (with divider to accommodate a helm) features …

medieval weapons rack - Google Search

medieval weapons rack - Google Search

Monk

Medieval flax Monk Robe with overcoat, hood and Original monks pouches bags. Available in: black flax linen, natural flax linen, brown flax linen, white flax linen

Medieval Western Knight's Armor Kit "The King's Guard"

Exclusive stainless functional knight's armor for SCA, medieval times reenactment and rebated steel tournaments. Perfect combat armour for modern historical medieval battle fighters.

The Lewis Chessmen, probably made in Norway, about AD 1150-1200. At this period, the Western Isles, where the chessmen were buried, were part of the Kingdom of Norway, not Scotland. It seems likely they were buried for safe keeping on route to be traded in Ireland.

These chess pieces, called the Lewis Chessmen, were found in Scotland (Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides) at some point before 1831 and were probably made in Scandinavia (thought to be Norway) about Walrus ivory and whales’ teeth.The British Museum.

Some of the Lewis Chessmen may not have been chessmen at all according to new research.    The 12th and 13th century gaming pieces which were discovered in Uig on the Isle of Lewis in 1831 are considered to be Scotland’s most renowned archaeological find.    An article in the journal Medieval Archaeology by David Caldwell, Mark Hall and Caroline Wilkinson suggests that many of the 93 ivory pieces may have been used in a game called hnefatafl – an ancient Viking board game that pre-dates…

ome of the Lewis Chessmen may not have been chessmen at all according to new research. The and century gaming pieces which were discovered in Uig on the Isle of Lewis in 1831 are considered to be Scotland’s most renowned archaeological find.