Maria Marszalek
Więcej pomysłów od użytkownika Maria
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Ekphrasis - used by de Botton in The Art of Travel

Ekphrasis - used by de Botton in The Art of Travel

"Austrian artist Anatlo Knotek is a self described visual poet who creates all his art with the help of the English alphabet. Knotek takes ordinary words and phrases and creates new visual puns and deconstructions. As words fall apart, come together, and reshuffle we see new meanings, poignant ideas, and revealed secret messages."

"Austrian artist Anatlo Knotek is a self described visual poet who creates all his art with the help of the English alphabet. Knotek takes ordinary words and phrases and creates new visual puns and deconstructions. As words fall apart, come together, and reshuffle we see new meanings, poignant ideas, and revealed secret messages."

concrete poetry

concrete poetry

Joseph Cornell, Crystal Cage, Portrait of Berenice, 1943.

Joseph Cornell, Crystal Cage, Portrait of Berenice, 1943.

Cut Paper Art Workshop with Fifth Graders at St. Timothy’s School, Los Angeles…

Cut Paper Art Workshop with Fifth Graders at St. Timothy’s School, Los Angeles…

Dutch bookstore chain Selexyz inside of a 13th century Dominican church in Maastricht, Holland

Dutch bookstore chain Selexyz inside of a 13th century Dominican church in Maastricht, Holland

The iconic 'Sugarcube' car park in Sheffield by London-based architects Allies and Morrison

The iconic 'Sugarcube' car park in Sheffield by London-based architects Allies and Morrison

Kekkillä / Linda Bergroth 5.9.09

Kekkillä / Linda Bergroth 5.9.09

The project’s unique challenges—a tight budget and steep, difficult terrain — led the architects to a creative solution that gave the house its delightfully sculptural appearance. Making the first floor’s envelope slightly narrower than the top one’s saved money while minimizing the amount of excavation required. “We were then able to create a wider floor plate on the upper level by having it cantilever over the lower level,” Dworkind explains. Photo by Adrien Williams.

The project’s unique challenges—a tight budget and steep, difficult terrain — led the architects to a creative solution that gave the house its delightfully sculptural appearance. Making the first floor’s envelope slightly narrower than the top one’s saved money while minimizing the amount of excavation required. “We were then able to create a wider floor plate on the upper level by having it cantilever over the lower level,” Dworkind explains. Photo by Adrien Williams.