Krzysztof Strugała
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Interposed between the left and right Lateral Lines in the coronal plane, sandwiched between the Superficial Front Line and Superficial Back Line in the sagittal plane, and surrounded by the helical Spiral and Functional lines, the Deep Front Line comprises the body's myofascial 'core'.

Interposed between the left and right Lateral Lines in the coronal plane, sandwiched between the Superficial Front Line and Superficial Back Line in the sagittal plane, and surrounded by the helical Spiral and Functional lines, the Deep Front Line comprises the body's myofascial 'core'.

The Front Functional Line extend the Arm Lines across the surface of the trunk to the contralateral pelvis and leg. This line is rarely employed in modulating standing posture. It comes into play primarily during athletic or other activity where one appendicular complex is stabilized, counterbalanced, or powered by its contralateral complement. An example is in a javelin throw or a baseball pitch, where the player powers up through the left leg and hip to throw an object with their right…

The Front Functional Line extend the Arm Lines across the surface of the trunk to the contralateral pelvis and leg. This line is rarely employed in modulating standing posture. It comes into play primarily during athletic or other activity where one appendicular complex is stabilized, counterbalanced, or powered by its contralateral complement. An example is in a javelin throw or a baseball pitch, where the player powers up through the left leg and hip to throw an object with their right…

The Back Functional Line extend the Arm Lines across the surface of the trunk to the contralateral pelvis and leg. This line is rarely employed in modulating standing posture. It comes into play primarily during athletic or other activity where one appendicular complex is stabilized, counterbalanced, or powered by its contralateral complement. An example is in a javelin throw or a baseball pitch, where the player powers up through the left leg and hip to throw an object with their right…

The Back Functional Line extend the Arm Lines across the surface of the trunk to the contralateral pelvis and leg. This line is rarely employed in modulating standing posture. It comes into play primarily during athletic or other activity where one appendicular complex is stabilized, counterbalanced, or powered by its contralateral complement. An example is in a javelin throw or a baseball pitch, where the player powers up through the left leg and hip to throw an object with their right…

The Arm Lines run from the axial skeleton to the four quadrants of the arm and four 'sides' of the hand, namely the thumb, little finger, palm, and back of the hand. Because human shoulders and arms are specialized for mobility, these multiple degrees of freedom require more variable lines of control and stabilization and thus more inter-line links. Nevertheless, the arms are logically arranged with a deep and superficial line along the back of the arm.

The Arm Lines run from the axial skeleton to the four quadrants of the arm and four 'sides' of the hand, namely the thumb, little finger, palm, and back of the hand. Because human shoulders and arms are specialized for mobility, these multiple degrees of freedom require more variable lines of control and stabilization and thus more inter-line links. Nevertheless, the arms are logically arranged with a deep and superficial line along the back of the arm.

The Spiral Line (SPL) loops around the the body in a double helix, joining each side of the skull across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and then around the ribs to cross in the front at the level of the navel to the same hip. From the hip, the SPL passes like a 'jump rope' along the thigh and shin to the medial arch, passing under the foot and running up the back and outside of the leg to the ischium and into the erector myofascia to end very close to where it started on the skull.

The Spiral Line (SPL) loops around the the body in a double helix, joining each side of the skull across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and then around the ribs to cross in the front at the level of the navel to the same hip. From the hip, the SPL passes like a 'jump rope' along the thigh and shin to the medial arch, passing under the foot and running up the back and outside of the leg to the ischium and into the erector myofascia to end very close to where it started on the skull.

The Lateral Line (LL) brackets each side of the body from the medial and lateral mid-point of the foot around the outside of the ankle and up the lateral aspect of the leg and thigh, passing along the trunk in a 'basket weave' or shoelace pattern under the shoulder to the skull in the region of the ear.

The Lateral Line (LL) brackets each side of the body from the medial and lateral mid-point of the foot around the outside of the ankle and up the lateral aspect of the leg and thigh, passing along the trunk in a 'basket weave' or shoelace pattern under the shoulder to the skull in the region of the ear.

The Superficial Front Line (SFL) connects the entire anterior surface of the body from the top of the feet to the side of the skull in two pieces - toes to pelvis and pelvis to head - which, when the hip is extended as in standing, function as one continuous line of integrated myofascia.

The Superficial Front Line (SFL) connects the entire anterior surface of the body from the top of the feet to the side of the skull in two pieces - toes to pelvis and pelvis to head - which, when the hip is extended as in standing, function as one continuous line of integrated myofascia.

The Superficial Back Line (SBL) connects and protects the entire posterior surface of the body like a carapace from the bottom of the foot to the top of the head in two pieces - toes to knees, and knees to brow. When the knees are extended, as in standing, the SBL functions as one continuous line of integrated fascia.

The Superficial Back Line (SBL) connects and protects the entire posterior surface of the body like a carapace from the bottom of the foot to the top of the head in two pieces - toes to knees, and knees to brow. When the knees are extended, as in standing, the SBL functions as one continuous line of integrated fascia.

Taśma powierzchowna tylna wg Myers

Taśma powierzchowna tylna wg Myers

Adam Bochenek. Anatomia człowieka. Anatomia ogólna kości. Stwy i więzadła. Mięśnie cz.I

Adam Bochenek. Anatomia człowieka. Anatomia ogólna kości. Stwy i więzadła. Mięśnie cz.I