Jakub Zawada
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La Pintura y la Guerra. Sursumkorda in memoriam

La Pintura y la Guerra. Sursumkorda in memoriam

Montezuma

Montezuma

Cortes and his army fight back into Tenochtitlan

Cortes and his army fight back into Tenochtitlan

José Daniel Cabrera Peña, La batala de Świecino, 1462.

José Daniel Cabrera Peña, La batala de Świecino, 1462.

Jim Carson Large Image View for De Sotos March to the Mississippi, Summer, 1540

Jim Carson Large Image View for De Sotos March to the Mississippi, Summer, 1540

Conquistadors II by RhysGriffiths.deviantart.com on @DeviantArt

Conquistadors II by RhysGriffiths.deviantart.com on @DeviantArt

Pizarro and The Thirteen of the Fame - Juan Lepiani

Pizarro and The Thirteen of the Fame - Juan Lepiani

La Pintura y la Guerra "Llegada de Hernán Cortés a Tenochtitlan"

La Pintura y la Guerra "Llegada de Hernán Cortés a Tenochtitlan"

On December 24, 1524, Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama, 1st Count of Vidigueira, passed away. He was one of the most successful explorers in the Age of Discovery and the commander of the first ships to sail directly from Europe to India.

On December 24, 1524, Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama, 1st Count of Vidigueira, passed away. He was one of the most successful explorers in the Age of Discovery and the commander of the first ships to sail directly from Europe to India.

When Cortés left Tenochtitlan in May 1520, he was the practical if not titular ruler of a great empire. When he returned in June, he was fish bait. He desperately tried to regain his former position, but to no avail. His people were prisoners, cut off from food, water and escape routes. Every day they went out to plead for peace or fight for control of the causeways, but for every Aztec they killed, 10 more appeared. The Aztecs destroyed the bridges to prevent the Spaniards' escape.

When Cortés left Tenochtitlan in May 1520, he was the practical if not titular ruler of a great empire. When he returned in June, he was fish bait. He desperately tried to regain his former position, but to no avail. His people were prisoners, cut off from food, water and escape routes. Every day they went out to plead for peace or fight for control of the causeways, but for every Aztec they killed, 10 more appeared. The Aztecs destroyed the bridges to prevent the Spaniards' escape.