Weed Identification

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green leaves are growing in the forest
The Only Weedy Plant Identification Guide You'll Ever Need
Weed Identification Guide
a plant growing out of the ground next to a tree
weeds to target late summer and fall
weeds to target late summer and fall - A Way To Garden
two white flowers with green leaves in the foreground and bushes in the back ground
weeds to target late summer and fall
Hedge bindweed flower, bracht
"How to Eradicate Invasive Plants" by Teri Dunn Chace Gardening, Organic Gardening, Companion Planting, Companion Planting Chart, Companion Planting Layout, Herbaceous Perennials
weeds to target late summer and fall
"How to Eradicate Invasive Plants" by Teri Dunn Chace
small white flowers with green leaves in the background
Gardening Basics: Identifying Weeds in Your Yard
Garlic mustard Garlic mustard was brought here for medicinal purposes and food, but it has become one of the worst forest invaders. A relative of mustard, this biennial plant produces thousands of seeds that can stay in the soil for seven years or more. Pull and properly dispose of plants just before they flower.
some black berries hanging from a tree branch
Gardening Basics: Identifying Weeds in Your Yard
Buckthorn Buckthorn, garlic mustard and purple loosestrife were once prized landscape plants, but they now crowd out native plants and disrupt natural ecosystems. It’s definitely worth your time and energy to try to get rid of them. Their presence reduces food sources and habitat for native birds, butterflies, beneficial insects and wildlife.
many different types of plants and shrubs
Weed Identification - Superior Lawn Care
Weed identification, do we really care what they look like??? Weeds are breaking my back and I cannot help but bend over and pull them out.
a patch of grass that is laying on the ground
Gardening Basics: Identifying Weeds in Your Yard
Crabgrass Crabgrass has a smaller, more fibrous root system. It thrives in hot, dry weather, making its presence known in mid- to late summer. You’ll find it growing in gardens, short-cropped lawns and places subject to hot, dry conditions. Mow lawns high to help lawn grass shade out the crabgrass. In the garden, you should pull crabgrass before the plants set seed, and mulch to help prevent seeds from sprouting.
the grass is green and brown with some thin branches sticking out of it's center
Gardening Basics: Identifying Weeds in Your Yard
Quack grass Quack grass is something most gardeners will encounter. It’s easy to identify by the long, white underground rhizomes that look like roots. Any piece of the rhizome that touches the ground can start a new plant. You must be thorough and persistent if you try to remove quack grass by hand.
the tall grass is green and brown in color
Gardening Basics: Identifying Weeds in Your Yard
Nutsedge Nutsedge (also called nutgrass) is another common problem. The grasslike plants form ­underground tubers called nutlets. Persistence, early intervention and an integrated management strategy are critical for control of these weeds.
a close up of some green plants with trees in the background
Gardening Basics: Identifying Weeds in Your Yard
Ragweed Ragweed is a plant that hay fever sufferers will particularly want to watch out for. You can usually find this pesky weed hiding behind its colorful neighbor, goldenrod. Be sure to mow it down or pull it before it has a chance to release its allergenic pollen.
purple flowers with green leaves in the background
Gardening Basics: Identifying Weeds in Your Yard
Creeping Charlie (ground ivy) Creeping Charlie (ground ivy) is another one I get questions about. It’s easy to identify by its round, scalloped leaves, which are fragrant when crushed. This shade-tolerant plant with purple spring flowers can quickly take over a lawn or garden bed. To get rid of it in the lawn, try a chelated iron-based weedkiller. In the garden, pull it out and mulch or use a total vegetation killer.
some pink flowers are growing in the grass
Gardening Basics: Identifying Weeds in Your Yard
Dame’s rocket Dame’s rocket is a trickier weed, because it’s often misidentified as woodland phlox, and it looks so pretty blooming on woodland edges in spring. Unfortunately, this nonnative weed is often included in wildflower mixes, and it quickly crowds out more desirable native plants. Look for the four-petaled flowers that distinguish this from the five-petaled flowers of phlox—and then get rid of it.