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Vintage-firearms. Looks like the rifle is from, "Quigley Down Under."

Vintage-firearms. Looks like the rifle is from, "Quigley Down Under."

Indian (Sind) matchlock, 18th century, 19th century percussion conversion, 46" flared muzzle barrel with mechanical damask spiral pattern throughout. The thickened breach with incised lattice pattern, probably talismanic. Integral opened sight, wood stock with deeply curved rear and dramatically flared butt the tips sheathed in red pigment inlaid segments with additional plain and matching overlays ahead. The fore stock with chiseled brass bands and cap. Drum conversion with handmade lock.

Indian (Sind) matchlock, 18th century, 19th century percussion conversion, 46" flared muzzle barrel with mechanical damask spiral pattern throughout. The thickened breach with incised lattice pattern, probably talismanic. Integral opened sight, wood stock with deeply curved rear and dramatically flared butt the tips sheathed in red pigment inlaid segments with additional plain and matching overlays ahead. The fore stock with chiseled brass bands and cap. Drum conversion with handmade lock.

Graham Turret Gun - Edmund H. Graham’s 1856 patent outlines the GOTD's unique features – a rotating turret with 5 .60 caliber chambers with each chamber set 72 degrees apart. But there was a problem. The horizontal turret design meant that at least 2 chambers were facing backwards towards the shooter and in an age of potential multiple discharges – Graham’s gun was a distinct liability to fire. Perhaps that is why there was only one? NRA National Firearms Museum in Fairfax, VA

Graham Turret Gun - Edmund H. Graham’s 1856 patent outlines the GOTD's unique features – a rotating turret with 5 .60 caliber chambers with each chamber set 72 degrees apart. But there was a problem. The horizontal turret design meant that at least 2 chambers were facing backwards towards the shooter and in an age of potential multiple discharges – Graham’s gun was a distinct liability to fire. Perhaps that is why there was only one? NRA National Firearms Museum in Fairfax, VA