Sierra leone

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Sierra Leone, Africa

Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone, Africa

Look at all those mangoes! A strong mother in Sierra Leone. Photo by Annabel Symington.

About the food of Sierra Leone

Look at all those mangoes! A strong mother in Sierra Leone. Photo by Annabel Symington.

Rue de Freetown, Sierra Leone Street of Freetown, Sierra Leone - We were on this street just a week ago.

Rue de Freetown, Sierra Leone Street of Freetown, Sierra Leone - We were on this street just a week ago.

Map of Sierra Leone

Map of Sierra Leone

What to eat in Sierra Leone #localfood #Africa

What to eat in Sierra Leone #localfood #Africa

5. What is the Capitol like? Freetown, Sierra Leone is overpopulated, nut very beautiful. It has many beaches off the coast and it's greatest treasure the cotton tree sitting right in the middle of the Capitol.

5. What is the Capitol like? Freetown, Sierra Leone is overpopulated, nut very beautiful. It has many beaches off the coast and it's greatest treasure the cotton tree sitting right in the middle of the Capitol.

Lion Mountain in Sierra Leone

Lion Mountain in Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone ethnic groups Courtesy  africanexecutive.com.  The red area should be written Krio, is where my family comes from, a lot of us are decendants of Jamaican Slaves

Sierra Leone ethnic groups Courtesy africanexecutive.com. The red area should be written Krio, is where my family comes from, a lot of us are decendants of Jamaican Slaves

Flight Officer Johnny Smythe, from Sierra Leone, enlisted in the RAF in 1939.  He was one of four out of a class of 90, to complete the tough training to be a Navigator. On his 28th bomber mission, in November 1943, he was wounded, shot down, and captured by Germans who could not believe they were looking at a Black officer. In Stalag Luft One, Smythe worked on the escape committee, but couldn’t break out himself: "I don’t think a six-foot-five black man would’ve got very far in Pomerania."

Flight Officer Johnny Smythe, from Sierra Leone, enlisted in the RAF in 1939. He was one of four out of a class of 90, to complete the tough training to be a Navigator. On his 28th bomber mission, in November 1943, he was wounded, shot down, and captured by Germans who could not believe they were looking at a Black officer. In Stalag Luft One, Smythe worked on the escape committee, but couldn’t break out himself: "I don’t think a six-foot-five black man would’ve got very far in Pomerania."

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