Hey, I just built a monument

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Aleksandra Domanović’s paper-stack sculptures act as printable monuments to the recently abolished .yu virtual domain, the Internet identification string of former Yugoslavia that dissolved in 2010 - seven years after the Republic’s dissolution. This ongoing series is comprised of A4 and A3 sheets of paper piled into steles. By printing the sheets full-bleed on the margins only, an image is formed on the lateral sides of the stack through the accumulation of thousands of sheets piled up.

Aleksandra Domanović’s paper-stack sculptures act as printable monuments to the recently abolished .yu virtual domain, the Internet identification string of former Yugoslavia that dissolved in 2010 - seven years after the Republic’s dissolution. This ongoing series is comprised of A4 and A3 sheets of paper piled into steles. By printing the sheets full-bleed on the margins only, an image is formed on the lateral sides of the stack through the accumulation of thousands of sheets piled up.

Alina Szapocznikow,  Monument to Polish-Soviet Friendship, 1954

Alina Szapocznikow, Monument to Polish-Soviet Friendship, 1954

A memorial against war : Czechoslovak Radio 1968, by Tamás St. Turba  When Czechoslovakia was invaded by the Soviet army in 1968, people resisted to the repression of political reforms through creative means. After people were forbidden to listen to radio broadcasts, they started attaching antennas to bricks as a sign of protest.  Nothing more than painted bricks...

A memorial against war : Czechoslovak Radio 1968, by Tamás St. Turba When Czechoslovakia was invaded by the Soviet army in 1968, people resisted to the repression of political reforms through creative means. After people were forbidden to listen to radio broadcasts, they started attaching antennas to bricks as a sign of protest. Nothing more than painted bricks...

Władysław Hasior

Władysław Hasior

Said Atabekov Korpeshe Flags, 2011 C-print on dibond  67 x 100 cm.

Said Atabekov Korpeshe Flags, 2011 C-print on dibond 67 x 100 cm.

In 1976, artists Zofia Kulik and Przemysław Kwiek were summoned to the Polish Ministry of Culture and Art in Warsaw. They were told that they were no longer allowed to represent Polish culture abroad. Their passports were withdrawn.  From 1971 onwards, both worked under the name KwieKulik. Until 1987, they produced what was considered one the most important bodies of political performances in Europe.

In 1976, artists Zofia Kulik and Przemysław Kwiek were summoned to the Polish Ministry of Culture and Art in Warsaw. They were told that they were no longer allowed to represent Polish culture abroad. Their passports were withdrawn. From 1971 onwards, both worked under the name KwieKulik. Until 1987, they produced what was considered one the most important bodies of political performances in Europe.

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