Colonialism/Imperialism

36 Pins
 11mo
two paintings of men sitting next to each other, one in white and the other in gold
Aurangzeb: Mughal Emperor
Though his name is barely known in the West, the Emperor Aurangzeb (r. 1658-1707) stands out as one of South Asia’s most controversial historical figures. Today—365 years after ascending the throne as the sixth Mughal Emperor—his name elicits a range of emotional responses across the subcontinent, inspired more by modern politics than historical reality.
an old painting with some people in it
Aurangzeb: Mughal Emperor
Though his name is barely known in the West, the Emperor Aurangzeb (r. 1658-1707) stands out as one of South Asia’s most controversial historical figures. Today—365 years after ascending the throne as the sixth Mughal Emperor—his name elicits a range of emotional responses across the subcontinent, inspired more by modern politics than historical reality.
a white building with flowers on the ground
Aurangzeb: Mughal Emperor
Though his name is barely known in the West, the Emperor Aurangzeb (r. 1658-1707) stands out as one of South Asia’s most controversial historical figures. Today—365 years after ascending the throne as the sixth Mughal Emperor—his name elicits a range of emotional responses across the subcontinent, inspired more by modern politics than historical reality.
May 23, 2021 marks the 70th anniversary of the signing of the “Seventeen Point Agreement of the Central People’s Government and the Local Government of Tibet on Measures for the Peaceful Liberation of Tibet.” This agreement legitimized claims of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) over Tibet and retroactively justified the previous year’s military invasion of eastern Tibet by the People’s Liberation Army (PLA). Tibet, The Negotiator, Olympic Torch, 70th Anniversary, Indian Army, Local Government, Previous Year, Seventeen, Government
The Seventeen Point Agreement: Seventy Years of China’s Occupation of Tibet
May 23, 2021 marks the 70th anniversary of the signing of the “Seventeen Point Agreement of the Central People’s Government and the Local Government of Tibet on Measures for the Peaceful Liberation of Tibet.” This agreement legitimized claims of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) over Tibet and retroactively justified the previous year’s military invasion of eastern Tibet by the People’s Liberation Army (PLA).
a group of people standing around each other with flags in the air and one person raising their hand
The Seventeen Point Agreement: Seventy Years of China’s Occupation of Tibet
May 23, 2021 marks the 70th anniversary of the signing of the “Seventeen Point Agreement of the Central People’s Government and the Local Government of Tibet on Measures for the Peaceful Liberation of Tibet.” This agreement legitimized claims of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) over Tibet and retroactively justified the previous year’s military invasion of eastern Tibet by the People’s Liberation Army (PLA).
an old drawing of a man on a horse in front of other men
The Fall of Tenochtitlan
After a brutal 75-day siege, the Mexica capital of Tenochtitlan surrendered on August 13, 1521. The war cost tens of thousands of lives, civilian and warrior alike. It was a war of atrocity, massacre, and systematic violence. By the end, a few thousand Spaniards under the command of Hernando Cortés fighting alongside many times more Indigenous warriors from places like Tlaxcala and Huexotzinco had destroyed one of the greatest cities of the early modern world, the seat of the Aztec Empire.
an old photo of two people in native american clothing, one with long hair and the other with large hoop earrings
The Dawes Act
Until the late nineteenth century, tribal nations across the United States owned their reservation lands as a community: families could settle, plant their crops, and own any improvements they built, but the land itself belonged to the entire nation for future generations’ use.
Until the late nineteenth century, tribal nations across the United States owned their reservation lands as a community: families could settle, plant their crops, and own any improvements they built, but the land itself belonged to the entire nation for future generations’ use. Reading, Social Engineering, Land For Sale, The Land, The United States, Acting, Engineering, United States
The Dawes Act
Until the late nineteenth century, tribal nations across the United States owned their reservation lands as a community: families could settle, plant their crops, and own any improvements they built, but the land itself belonged to the entire nation for future generations’ use.
an old black and white photo of a woman with long hair holding something in her hand
The Dawes Act
Until the late nineteenth century, tribal nations across the United States owned their reservation lands as a community: families could settle, plant their crops, and own any improvements they built, but the land itself belonged to the entire nation for future generations’ use.
March 3, 1857 marked the unofficial beginning of the so-called Second Opium War (officially 1856-1860), a conflict that not only forced that narcotic drug deep into China’s politics, public health, and economics but also cemented the country’s status as both a prize and a battleground for Euro-American imperialist powers. Platypus, China, Taiping, Taiping Rebellion, Social Democracy, Boxer Rebellion, British Army, Art For Kids, Lost
The Second Opium War
March 3, 1857 marked the unofficial beginning of the so-called Second Opium War (officially 1856-1860), a conflict that not only forced that narcotic drug deep into China’s politics, public health, and economics but also cemented the country’s status as both a prize and a battleground for Euro-American imperialist powers.
black and white photograph of an old building with stairs leading up to the upper floor
The Second Opium War
March 3, 1857 marked the unofficial beginning of the so-called Second Opium War (officially 1856-1860), a conflict that not only forced that narcotic drug deep into China’s politics, public health, and economics but also cemented the country’s status as both a prize and a battleground for Euro-American imperialist powers.
an old painting with people standing around
The Second Opium War
March 3, 1857 marked the unofficial beginning of the so-called Second Opium War (officially 1856-1860), a conflict that not only forced that narcotic drug deep into China’s politics, public health, and economics but also cemented the country’s status as both a prize and a battleground for Euro-American imperialist powers.