Harlem Renaissance

Collection by Herb Harris

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Art and culture inspired by the Harlem Renaissance

Herb Harris
Duke Ellington performed regularly here, and Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holiday both launched their careers at the venue’s amateur night. You can say that the Apollo Theater was the ‘Motown’ before Motown. Today, the theater stands as an artifact on the bustling 125th street.

Black History Month: Scenes From The Harlem Renaissance

Still setting the standard for black art and thought.

Vocalists of the Harlem Renaissance

Vocalists of the Harlem Renaissance

Langston Hughes (1902-1967).  Playwright, novelist, and poet who due to his African American themes made him a primary contributor to the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920's.

Langston Hughes (1902-1967). Playwright, novelist, and poet who due to his African American themes made him a primary contributor to the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920's.

The Harlem Renaissance

The Harlem Renaissance

James Weldon Johnson (Lift Every Voice and Sing)

James Weldon Johnson (Lift Every Voice and Sing)

Richmond Barthe Artwork | Richmond Barthé, 1901-1989 James Richmond Barthé was an African-American sculptor known for his many public works, including the Toussaint L’Ouverture Monument in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and a sculpture of Rose McClendon for Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater.

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Cotton Club

Cotton Club

Harlem Renaissance…1920’s

THE MOB, FASHION, OMERTA...

Harlem Renaissance…1920’s

Langston Hughes' born Feb. 1, 1902. "What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up Like a raisin in the sun? Or fester like a sore-- And then run? Does it stink like rotten meat? Or crust and sugar over-- like a syrupy sweet? Maybe it just sags like a heavy load. Or does it explode?"

Langston Hughes' born Feb. 1, 1902. "What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up Like a raisin in the sun? Or fester like a sore-- And then run? Does it stink like rotten meat? Or crust and sugar over-- like a syrupy sweet? Maybe it just sags like a heavy load. Or does it explode?"

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Claude McKay, Author of "Home To Harlem"

LANGSTON HUGHES

LANGSTON HUGHES

Octavia Butler was an American science fiction writer, one of the best-known among the few African-American women in the field. She won both Hugo and Nebula awards. In 1995, she became the first science fiction writer to receive the MacArthur Foundation Genius Grant. Butler passed away on February 24, 2006.

African-Americans who have made a difference

See photos of African-Americans who have made a difference