Aleksandra Kaleta
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Drawers Date: 1840s Culture: American Medium: linen Dimensions: Length: 37 in. (94 cm) Credit Line: Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Thompson, 1952 Accession Number: C.I.52.48.1

Drawers Date: 1840s Culture: American Medium: linen Dimensions: Length: 37 in. (94 cm) Credit Line: Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Thompson, 1952 Accession Number: C.I.52.48.1

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York extant Circa 1600 possibly women's 'drawers' "Linen drawers embroidered in silver and silver-gilt thread. Embroidered border, and bobbin lace worked in metal threads and two different brown silks." Janet Arnold's 'Queen Elizabeth's Wardrobe Unlock'd'

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York extant Circa 1600 possibly women's 'drawers' "Linen drawers embroidered in silver and silver-gilt thread. Embroidered border, and bobbin lace worked in metal threads and two different brown silks." Janet Arnold's 'Queen Elizabeth's Wardrobe Unlock'd'

Made 1540-1549, linen w/silk thread. Until the mid 20th century a man’s shirt was an item of underwear. However, those parts of it exposed when the wearer was fully dressed were often embellished.

Made 1540-1549, linen w/silk thread. Until the mid 20th century a man’s shirt was an item of underwear. However, those parts of it exposed when the wearer was fully dressed were often embellished.

silk stockings.  NAME  Owner :Gustav II Adolf of Sweden  Manufacturer :Sebastian Lellij  DATING  about 1620  OTHER KEYWORDS  sock  COLLECTION OF THE  Royal Armoury  INVENTORY NUMBER  19833 (3378: b)

silk stockings. NAME Owner :Gustav II Adolf of Sweden Manufacturer :Sebastian Lellij DATING about 1620 OTHER KEYWORDS sock COLLECTION OF THE Royal Armoury INVENTORY NUMBER 19833 (3378: b)

Linen Glove with cutwork and bobbin lace.  made in England C.1610

Linen Glove with cutwork and bobbin lace. made in England C.1610

17th century gloves, British, made of leather, metal thread and silk, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

17th century gloves, British, made of leather, metal thread and silk, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

17th Century Leather Gloves

17th Century Leather Gloves

Although a few finely worked linen hoods survive in museum collections, they are very rarely seen in portraits of the late 16th and early 17th century. It is possible that they were outdoor and/or middle-class accessories and therefore seldom appear in Tudor and Jacobean portraiture which emphasises the formal dress of the aristocracy. This hood is very modestly adorned with insertion work (bobbin lace worked between two pieces of linen) and a bobbin lace edging,

Although a few finely worked linen hoods survive in museum collections, they are very rarely seen in portraits of the late 16th and early 17th century. It is possible that they were outdoor and/or middle-class accessories and therefore seldom appear in Tudor and Jacobean portraiture which emphasises the formal dress of the aristocracy. This hood is very modestly adorned with insertion work (bobbin lace worked between two pieces of linen) and a bobbin lace edging,

Although a few finely worked linen hoods survive in museum collections, they are very rarely seen in portraits of the late 16th and early 17th century. It is possible that they were outdoor and/or middle-class accessories and therefore seldom appear in Tudor and Jacobean portraiture which emphasises the formal dress of the aristocracy. This hood is very modestly adorned with insertion work (bobbin lace worked between two pieces of linen) and a bobbin lace edging,

Although a few finely worked linen hoods survive in museum collections, they are very rarely seen in portraits of the late 16th and early 17th century. It is possible that they were outdoor and/or middle-class accessories and therefore seldom appear in Tudor and Jacobean portraiture which emphasises the formal dress of the aristocracy. This hood is very modestly adorned with insertion work (bobbin lace worked between two pieces of linen) and a bobbin lace edging,

Elizabethan/early 17th century coif cap tutorial

Elizabethan/early 17th century coif cap tutorial