first half of 18th c.

Circa. 1748

Circa. 1748

class research - Such ensembles as this were a popular choice for informal and everyday wear, worn in and out of the house.  This example is significant for being made of printed cotton (chintz/calico) since this textile became increasingly popular and fashionable over the course of the eighteenth century.

EXHIBITION

class research - Such ensembles as this were a popular choice for informal and everyday wear, worn in and out of the house. This example is significant for being made of printed cotton (chintz/calico) since this textile became increasingly popular and fashionable over the course of the eighteenth century.

Gloves    Date:      early 18th century  Culture:      British  Medium:      Leather, metallic

Gloves Date: early 18th century Culture: British Medium: Leather, metallic

1750 dress

1750 dress

1740s stays and other undies (lots of pictures and construction info)

1740s stays and other undies (lots of pictures and construction info)

Corset    Date:      early 18th century  Culture:      Spanish  Medium:      silk

Corset Date: early 18th century Culture: Spanish Medium: silk

Woman's Corset  France, circa 1730-1740  Costumes; underwear (upper body)  Silk plain weave with supplementary weft-float patterning  Center back length: 16 1/2 in. (41.91 cm)  Gift of Mr. Jack Cole (63.24.5)

Woman's Corset France, circa 1730-1740 Costumes; underwear (upper body) Silk plain weave with supplementary weft-float patterning Center back length: 16 1/2 in. (41.91 cm) Gift of Mr. Jack Cole (63.24.5)

1720s British Stomacher at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York - The tabs along the sides allowed the stomacher to be pinned to the gown. The different pieces of a woman's dress were held together with straight pins, but chances of being pricked by them were low as there were still the stays and chemise between the dress and the skin.

1720s British Stomacher at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York - The tabs along the sides allowed the stomacher to be pinned to the gown. The different pieces of a woman's dress were held together with straight pins, but chances of being pricked by them were low as there were still the stays and chemise between the dress and the skin.

A painting of two girls from around 1720-30 you can see how fashion is changing with more lace and a losser waist but not too lose as the stayes where offten laced so tight as to make the shoulders back until the shoulder blades almost touched but it gave the ideal figure with good posture and a full bosom

A painting of two girls from around 1720-30 you can see how fashion is changing with more lace and a losser waist but not too lose as the stayes where offten laced so tight as to make the shoulders back until the shoulder blades almost touched but it gave the ideal figure with good posture and a full bosom

Notice the buttons are off center on the bodice. "Catherine Douglas (née Hyde), Duchess of Queensberry" attributed to Charles Jervas (1725-1730) at the National Portrait Gallery, London - From the curators' comments: "Painted at a time when Arcadian themes were fashionable, the Duchess is shown enjoying a rustic idyll. Her hand rests on a milk pail while a real milkmaid is shown milking cows in the background."

Notice the buttons are off center on the bodice. "Catherine Douglas (née Hyde), Duchess of Queensberry" attributed to Charles Jervas (1725-1730) at the National Portrait Gallery, London - From the curators' comments: "Painted at a time when Arcadian themes were fashionable, the Duchess is shown enjoying a rustic idyll. Her hand rests on a milk pail while a real milkmaid is shown milking cows in the background."

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