class research - Such ensembles as this were a popular choice for informal and everyday wear, worn in and out of the house.  This example is significant for being made of printed cotton (chintz/calico) since this textile became increasingly popular and fashionable over the course of the eighteenth century.

EXHIBITION

Printed Cotton Jacket & Petticoat, century Reproduced from Patterns of Fashion and Museum of London examples Museum of London. (made by brocade goddess)

Gloves    Date:      early 18th century  Culture:      British  Medium:      Leather, metallic

Gloves Date: early century Culture: British Medium: Leather, metallic Credit Line: Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, Museum Expedition Purchased with funds given by Frederic

1750 dress

Dress Date: ca. 1750 Culture: French Medium: silk Dimensions: Length at CB (a): 63 in. cm) Length at CB (b): 40 in. cm) Credit Line: Gift of Mrs. Robert Woods Bliss, 1943 Accession Number: b

1720s British Stomacher at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York - The tabs along the sides allowed the stomacher to be pinned to the gown. The different pieces of a woman's dress were held together with straight pins, but chances of being pricked by them were low as there were still the stays and chemise between the dress and the skin.

Stomacher Date: Culture: British Medium: Silk, metal Dimensions: Length: 13 in. cm) Credit Line: Purchase, Rogers Fund, Isabel Shults Fund and Irene Lewisohn Bequest, 1991 Accession Number:

Notice the buttons are off center on the bodice. "Catherine Douglas (née Hyde), Duchess of Queensberry" attributed to Charles Jervas (1725-1730) at the National Portrait Gallery, London - From the curators' comments: "Painted at a time when Arcadian themes were fashionable, the Duchess is shown enjoying a rustic idyll. Her hand rests on a milk pail while a real milkmaid is shown milking cows in the background."

"Catherine Douglas (née Hyde), Duchess of Queensberry" attributed to Charles Jervas at the National Portrait Gallery, London

Stays, Probably England or United States, c. 1725-1750. Blue glazed wool twill, buckram, linen thread, baleen, leather, linen tape, two-ply linen cord wrapped in silk, checked linen plain weave lining.

Glazed wool twill corset with linen thread, baleen, linen tape, two-ply linen cord wrapped in silk and checked linen plain weave lining. Europe or United States,

Stomacher, mid-18th century Stomacher with a trefoil point at the bottom, solidly embroidered in silver metallic yarns with a symmetrical design of flowers and leaves, framed by two spiralling ribbons.

Stomacher, century Stomacher with a trefoil point at the bottom, solidly embroidered in silver metallic yarns with a symmetrical design of flowers and leaves, framed by two spiralling ribbons.

Mantua, ca. 1735; VAM T.23-1972

Gown

Formal day dress, ca 1735 England (Spitalfields) (altered and the Victoria and Albert Museum “ By the the open robe was beginning to replace the mantua as formal day wear. The beautifully patterned Spitalfields silk indicates a.

1720, Germany - Pair of embroidered mitts, in blue silk satin and embroidered with metal thread. These mitts were carefully sewn together using the tiniest pieces of the preciously embroidered silk.

Pair of embroidered mitts, in blue silk satin and embroidered with metal thread, Germany, around These mitts were carefully sewn together using the tiniest pieces of the preciously embroidered silk.

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