A Demo of the "whole nine yards" Where they take nine yards of tartan, pleat it by hand, belt it and wear it, with enough left over for over the shoulder fly plaid. This was how it was done back in the day, for real.

A Demo of the "whole nine yards" Where they take nine yards of tartan, pleat it by hand, belt it and wear it, with enough left over for over the shoulder fly plaid.-wonderful demo with practical options!

Isabella MacTavish’s Wedding Dress c1785. Fraser clan tartan. Inverness Museum. The cloth itself is probably considerably older than the dress, and possibly dates to 1740 - 1760. Women -- Clothing & dress -- 1700-1799 -- Scotland. 18th century Scottish costume.

From the archive: Isabella MacTavish Fraser's Wedding Dress, wool, Scotland, used continuously by a single family since it was made in last worn in Collection of Inverness Museums & Art Gallery.

"Arisaid" was the earliest form of women's dress in Scotland.

Arisaid was the earliest form of women's dress in Scotland . must have been one of Henry's poor relations ~

Portrait of Jenny Cameron of Glendessary, who led her clan's troops to Glenfinnan at the start of the Jacobite Rising in August, 1745.

1740 Allan Ramsay - Portrait of a lady, traditionally identified as Jenny Cameron of Lochiel

Tartan coat from a Royal Company of Archers uniform, of hard twill weave wool with wooden buttons, silk fringing and linen lining: c. 1750 Museum of Scotland

I could totally pull this off. Tartan coat from a Royal Company of Archers uniform, of hard twill weave wool with wooden buttons, silk fringing and linen lining: c. 1750 Museum of Scotland

Original kilt was one piece

Original kilt was one piece. It was not called kilt but tartan or plaid (tbv). England forbade the Scots to wear it. tbv, since 1745 ?

Wool/silk 1740 MET 1990.24  Looks like a girl's gown pieced mid skirt, back lacing closed front bodice with open skirt.  Very interesting construction.

Dress Date: ca. 1740 Culture: British Medium: wool, silk Credit Line: Purchase, Polaire Weissman Gift, 1990 Accession Number:

Painting by George W. Joy depicting Bonnie Prince Charlie taking his leave with the Scottish heroine Flora MacDonald, after she helped him flee Scotland.

Outlander: Painting by George W. Joy depicting Bonnie Prince Charlie taking his leave with the Scottish heroine Flora MacDonald, after she helped him flee Scotland.

Detail: Man's coat, Woollen, twill-weave hard tartan, Scottish, 1740–50. Carefully cut so the pattern lines up when sewn together. Said to have been worn by a rider in Bonnie Prince Charlie's army at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. This tartan pattern, or sett, is still available today as 1328 Culloden (District) tartan. © CSG CIC

Detail: Man's coat, Woollen, twill-weave hard tartan, Scottish, Carefully cut so the pattern lines up when sewn together.

Jacobite fashion.  Perhaps the Hon. Anne, eldest daughter of Sir Jacob de Bouverie, 1st Viscount Folkestone  ca. 1740-45  Bartholomew Dandridge

Lady, thought to be the Hon. Anne, eldest daughter of Sir Jacob de Bouverie, Viscount Folkestone by Bartholomew Dandridge (Lane Fine Art)

Cosmo Alexander (1724-1772.) Portrait of a Jacobite Lady. Oil on Canvas. Circa 1745-1750's. The Drambuie Collection, Edinburgh.

Cosmo Alexander Portrait of a Jacobite Lady. Cosmo Alexander was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, the son of Catholic portrait painter & engraver John Alexander and the great grandson of George Jameson whom Horace Walpole called "the Vandyke of Scotland.

John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore, Governor of the Province of New York (1770-‘71) and Virginia (1771-‘75), Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1765

TARTAN: John Murray, Earl of Dunmore, Governor of the Province of New York and Virginia Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1765

painting of Flora MacDonald in 1747

Circa 1747 portrait of Flora Macdonald (Fionnghal Nighean Raghnaill ’ic Aonghais Òig) by Richard Wilson Oil on canvas. x Flora Macdonald was a Jacobite heroine, who helped Prince Charles Edward Stuart to escape after the Battle of Culloden.

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