Agata Wąsik
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Food Browning by Maillard Reaction The browning of these food stuffs is due to Maillard Reaction / Non enzymatic browningas part of his PhD thesis in the year 1912 and are therefore known as the Maillard reaction. Browning, or the Maillard reaction, creates flavor and changes the color of food, the taste and color to baked bread and even the turning of beer brown. Maillard reactions generally only begin to occur above 285°F (140°C). reaction for the characteristic aromas it produces

The browning of these food stuffs is due to Maillard Reaction creates flavor and changes the color of food generally only begin to occur above occurs between amino acids

Better Cooking with Science: The kitchen's a laboratory, and everything that happens there has to do with science. It's biology, chemistry, physics. Yes, there's history. Yes, there's artistry. Yes, to all of that. But what happened there, what actually happens to the food is all science. ~Alton Brown http://cen.acs.org/articles/90/i40/Maillard-Reaction-Turns-100.html

I have made this recipe many, many times. It is always a success. You can make it with bay or sea scallops. A nice and inexpensive.

AN EXCELLENT ARTICLE ON THE MAILLARD REACTION -- the browning of food to add flavor; how it works, why it works.  Also tips on better flavor in caramelizing onions faster using baking soda and salt in small quantities.

Is there a way to speed up the browning of onions? (Photo: Frying onion from Bigstock) An idea that struck me once was to add baking soda to browning onions. I chopped an onion, melted butter in a …

Maximizing Food Flavor by Speeding Up the Maillard Reaction » Khymos

Maximizing Food Flavor by Speeding Up the Maillard Reaction - Adding baking soda increases the speed of browning onions and sweetens their taste. Read this pin for the explanation of why?

Senomyx

Senomyx product Sweetmyx not deemed GRAS by FDA --March 2014

The Flavor Star by @cooksmarts #flavor #cookingtips

Flavours and flavourings: getting the balance right -- Salty (Umami), Sweet, Sour, Spicey, Bitter

ye they call “bonji” (“essence”). They’ve even replicated the Japanese staple katsuobushi (a log of dried, smoked, and fermented bonito that’s shaved into bonito flakes) using fermented pork tenderloin instead of fish.

The "umami" craze has turned a much-maligned and misunderstood food additive into an object of obsession for the world's most innovative chefs. But secret ingredient monosodium glutamat